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Wow, it's been a bit since I've posted to my LJ. The absence was far from planned, but is as it is. The writing front has been a bit up and down for me through June and July, though I'm hoping to see that turn around.

I've been writing a bit of non-fiction for Vision (www.lazette.net/vision) and finally critting again, but on the home front, there hasn't been much fiction going on.

Molly stands about 15k from the end. It's not her fault. A combination of family stuff and a serious, knock me on my back, cold put an end to creativity for a bit. As much as I'd like to blame Molly, so I could move on to something else, it's not her fault. There's also the chance that with things so crazy, the hormone replacement isn't doing its job, a lovely thought considering that some day I'll have to go through ending the medication. But since this is affecting my creativity across the board, Molly is not to blame.

Neither is Selkie, another project currently in limbo. I had started collecting action points and possible reworks as I went through all the wonderful crits, but hit that same wall. This isn't a writer's block as much as a creativity amputation. The good news is that it's starting to fade...I'll admit needing 10+ hours of sleep a night has been a part of this mess.

Oh, and it's even affected my reading. I'm halfway through my very first issue of Neo-Opsis. I was enjoying it a lot, but just haven't read any. I started an issue of Discover magazine... The one thing I am reading is Steven Barnes' Lion's Blood, which I was thinking was too slow and I couldn't find the story and and... Until I realized that it's an epic. It's not about a specific tale. It's about a world and its people and how they interact and how their lives are intertwined. It's exactly the type of novel I love...or used to. So I'm adding this to the pile of missing creativity because all I can read right now easily are short, sweet things that don't ask for much.

Oh, and I need to do something with my hands all the time. I went to a wonderful acapella singing group with my sister and had a wonderful time, but if she hadn't given me some string to weave (okay, crochet without a hook and no, the results weren't pretty) I'd have lost it.

So...that's my update (note the extensive use of ellipses because my mind trails off all the time), and join me in the hope that it's coming to an end. For two days I slept a normal amount and had at least a couple hours of productivity, including sending Shadows of the Sun out to agents. Today was a little rough, but still some useful moments. Here's hoping to find a trend in the right direction.

Oh, and as a last note, a bunch of my first drafts have been calling of late, pulling me into the morass of new things to edit so I don't have to do the hard work of a final polish. I plan to resist until Selkie's set.
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I'll bet some of you thought you'd get an update on March Madness when it was over, hmm?  Well, the week kind of got away from me so here it is a bit late.

I managed 9,672 words on Molly for March Madness.  If you remember back to my last post, this is just over 4,000 shy of where I wanted to be.  While that is a sad thing, it's not as bad as it might sound.

Last year, in the midst of my medical disasters, I wrote about 9,550 words for March Madness.  I was determined to do better this year, and I did...by just over 100 words.  While this was not the margin I'd hoped for, there's another side to this story that is the much more important one.

After the 2008 March Madness, I put down the novel with an exhausted sigh...and still haven't picked it up again.  Karth's Story is currently moldering in the corner, marking the first unfinished novel I've written since possibly 1995 or even earlier.  That said, I do have plans to jump back in and finish it up at some point, but I'm avoiding it for the time being.

What's different about this most recent March Madness is that Molly has already gained three more scenes and stands at 12,340.

For me, this is a creeping pace, and it's very rough going, but there are reasons for that which do not involve failure on my part.

Molly is an experiment, a novel being written using another writer's methodology.  As you might remember, I'm taking Holly Lisle's How to Think Sideways course right now.  I've found some parts of it click into holes in my process with a smooth glide while others it is like jamming a puzzle piece into the almost appropriate opposite.

Now I'm not your typical Thinking Sideways candidate, especially on the writing side, because I already have a serious pile of finished first drafts.  This has led to a disconnect with some of her lessons where I have already developed a system that works for me, sometimes similar, sometimes taking things a step further, and sometimes completely on another plane.  None of which negates the value of the class.

As a writer, I feel I should be constantly open to exploring new methods, new avenues.  Even if I have something that works perfectly, by expanding my horizons, I may discover a way to grow as a writer that my old method was obscuring.  And stagnation is something I oppose with every atom in my body.

Besides that, in the areas where my process is still mutating, having solid advice from an experienced writer who is able to communicate her methodology in ways that allow other writers, especially newer ones, to understand is never a bad thing.

However, speaking specifically on the process of preparing a story to fly, I'm too organic for her methodology.  While hers is valuable as a companion tool to recognize which scenes are solid and which scenes are likely to end up on the cutting room floor, it does not click me into the story enough so that I am living and breathing it.  I still need to make one of my style of outlines to achieve that, something it's too late in my process to do at this point for Molly.

So, my plan now is just to struggle through and recognize I've got a serious editing project ahead of me.

Oddly, this is a good thing because my editing process is still under development.  I've completed quite a few edits I think are successful, but the process is more cumbersome than I appreciate.  If Molly's first draft came through mostly clean, it would make a poor learning manuscript for the editing phase of the class.  We learn more when things are broken and going rough than when we can just skate, whether talking writing, academics, programming, or what have you.

Ultimately, Molly's in for a hard ride, but if she can come out gleaming, not only will I have learned a thing or two, but I think she'll have a nice run at the YA market.

And stats:
New Words: 721 words
44 scenes
14 complete - 32% of the novel
30 Scenes remain
26,443 Remaining word count
38,783 Estimated length - with an average of 881 words per scene.
12,340 Current Total


 


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March Madness is drawing near (only one sleep away) and the novel for this challenge is Molly, the Asteroid Miner's Daughter.  This is one of my ideas generated during Holly Lisle's How to Think Sideways class (http://howtothinksideways.com/members/?rid=190).  I'm tracking its progress in detail through the Thinking Sideways forums and my related blog, but I thought I'd drop a mention here as well.

It's difficult when you have established, successful processes to tackle learning a new one, but I've found that resting on any particular process is dangerous as you may run into a particular novel or circumstance that bucks your previous patterns and demands skill sets you have to discover if you haven't broadened your base.  That doesn't mean learning something new is easy, but it's definitely worth the trip if only to know what doesn't work for you.

Honestly, it's the other parts of Holly's class that appeal more, the insider tips for managing publishing contracts and making things happen in an organized fashion rather than a mad scramble.  I'm on the cusp of entering that lifestyle, and I need all the help I can get so I don't dissolve into the chaos that draws me :).

So, we'll see how it goes.  I have created (and finally sorted) a 41 scene outline for which most scenes have been verified using Holly's techniques.  I'd hoped for all of them, but a huge project for the boys' school sucked up all my time.  I'll have to verify as I go, but I have some 19+ verified so I've got a bit of room.

Oh, my goal for this March Madness (a mad dash for words from 7k to 40k and a finished book in a week through Forward Motion) is to achieve at least 14k.  I had enough problems with last year that I managed a mere 9k, and I plan to do better, darn it.

And stats:
New Words: 0 words
41 scenes
0 complete - 0% of the novel
41 Scenes remain
61500 Estimated length - with an average of 1500 words per scene.
0 Current Total
 

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